Harbouring Fanon

10  prints – Woodcut and transfer with watercolour. Edition 5

This series of ten prints, Harbouring Fanon merges the concept of harbours as both a literal place, a space in which ships are anchored, with the concept of giving harbour or shelter to a particular vision of the world. I draw on two visual tropes, early cartography which track  European Empires initial forays into depicting the harbours of potentially profitable territories and the contemporary mapping of space via Google Maps. These two tropes are separated by time but are conflated onto specific harbours.

This series of prints merges the concept of harbours as both a literal place, a space in which ships are anchored and merchandise, ideas and languages are exchanged, and the concept of giving harbour or shelter to a particular vision of the world. I draw on two visual tropes, early maps which track  European Empires initial forays into depicting the harbours of potentially profitable territories and the contemporary mapping of space via Google Maps. These two tropes are separated by time but are conflated onto specific geographic locations.

However, I also see this series as a non-mimetic portrait of Franz Fanon through a depiction of some of the literal harbours he travelled in his lifetime.  The ten prints track his life from his birthplace on the island of Martinique to his death place in Bethesda, Maryland. In Harbouring Fanon in Bethesda, both the place of Fanons birth and the place of his death are referred to. The central image in Harbouring Fanon In Bethesda depicts the Google maps birds eye view of the location of the hospital in which Fanon died in Bethesda, Maryland. The stylized ocean surrounding this ‘portrait’ is the same sea depicted in the first image of the series Harbouring Fanon in Martinique.